Monthly Archives: August 2013

The Cosmic Orphan (part 7)

An essay by Loren Eiseley (1907 – 1977) The Encyclopaedia Britannica (15th ed. Propædia ed.) The essay will be posted here in several parts. Molecular biologists have begun to consider whether the marvelous living alphabet which lies at the root

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The Cosmic Orphan (part 6)

An essay by Loren Eiseley (1907 – 1977) The Encyclopaedia Britannica (15th ed. Propædia ed.) The essay will be posted here in several parts. Scientists have found that the very symbols which crowd our brains may possess their own dangers.

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The Cosmic Orphan (part 5)

An essay by Loren Eiseley (1907 – 1977) The Encyclopaedia Britannica (15th ed. Propædia ed.) The essay will be posted here in several parts. “This is a fairy tale,” protested the Orphan. “I am here, I will look in the

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The Cosmic Orphan (part 4)

An essay by Loren Eiseley (1907 – 1977) The Encyclopaedia Britannica (15th ed. Propædia ed.) The essay will be posted here in several parts. When in following years scientific experiment and observation became current, a vast change began to pass

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The Cosmic Orphan (part 3)

An essay by Loren Eiseley (1907 – 1977) The Encyclopaedia Britannica (15th ed. Propædia ed.) The essay will be posted here in several parts. Long ago, however, in one of the Dead Sea Scrolls hidden in the Judaean Desert, an

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The Cosmic Orphan (part 2)

An essay by Loren Eiseley (1907 – 1977) The Encyclopaedia Britannica (15th ed. Propædia ed.) The essay will be posted here in several parts. “Papa,” I said in the evening by the oil lamp in our kitchen. “Tell me how

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The Cosmic Orphan (part 1)

An essay by Loren Eiseley (1907 – 1977) The Encyclopaedia Britannica (15th ed. Propædia ed.) The essay will be posted here in several parts. When I was a young lad of that indefinite but important age when one begins to

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Home

Every moment art, every instant epic Full palette, empty canvas Boxes scattered, still unpacked Furniture is pragmatic made for resting, not for watching the work to begin again Reminders to us all of hopes, of dreams A home escape from

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A Philosophical Argument for the Christian God

A deductive argument is one in which the conclusion follows inescapably from the premises, if the premises are true. The classic example of a deductive argument is this: 1. All men are mortal. 2. Socrates is a man. Therefore, Socrates

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DESIGN, IRREDUCIBLE COMPLEXITY, AND SPECIFIED COMPLEXITY

This is a philosophical response to critics of irreducible complexity such as John H. McDonald, who rightly claim that parts of e.g. mousetrap (A) can be used to make simpler mousetraps, and that these simpler versions can be arranged in

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